Army Reserve Training

Upon entering the Army Reserve, everyone selects or is assigned a Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). Soldiers are assigned an MOS based on several factors, including an individual's interest and aptitude, availability and the Army's needs. Once a Soldier has been assigned an MOS, the training begins for the Soldier to become qualified in that skill area. Army Reserve units often train with Active and National Guard units to ensure all three components of the U.S. Army work as a seamless, fully integrated force.

Basic Training

This is where the process of becoming a U.S. Soldier - both mentally and physically - begins. During Basic Training, Soldiers get in the best physical shape of their lives and learn how to dress, act and talk like a Soldier. Along the way, they discover a higher level of self-confidence and an inner strength that they will use in the Army Reserve and beyond.

Advanced Individual Training

Once Soldiers complete Basic Training they move on to Advanced Individual Training (AIT). This is where each Soldier learns the skills needed to perform his or her MOS. AIT consists of classroom time, learning what it takes to do a job, and time in the field, learning exactly how to do it.

Continued Training

The learning and training doesn't stop once Soldiers have completed AIT. In order to stay sharp and focused, Army Reserve Soldiers are required to participate in Sustainment Training on a regular basis.

Drill

Drills occur approximately one weekend a month. Units get together at their Post or Reserve Center to learn new skills, hone old ones and basically keep everything - and everyone - prepared if national or global events require their involvement.

Annual Training

Annual Training occurs approximately two weeks each year. During this time, several units converge on their assigned Post to perform a more involved training exercise. It is conducted in a real world scenario, providing a realistic, hands-on setting for the Soldiers to put their skills to work and to become adept with various pieces of Army Reserve equipment.

Innovative Readiness

Training Innovative Readiness Training (IRT) is a Department of Defense program to put the skills, capabilities and resources of the military to work addressing serious domestic needs in the United States. IRT allows Army Reserve units to improve their readiness by planning and executing training exercises that also assist their home communities. Examples of past IRT initiatives include constructing rural roads, providing medical and dental care to underserved communities, and loading and transporting food to food banks.

When the Army Reserve is called to action, their Soldiers must be ready and properly trained. One way these Soldiers stay sharp is by practicing and refining their skills during Army Reserve drills.

Army Reserve Unit Training

Military Police Unit Training
327th Military Police Batallion
Arlington Heights, IL

Helicopter Gunnery Unit Training
224th Aviation Brigade
Ft Carson, CO

Field Training Exercises (FTX)

Bridge Crossing FTX
459th Multi-Role Bridge Company
Fort Chaffee, AK
For the Army to stay mobile, it has to rely on its ingenuity and strength to get the job done. Many times temporary bridges have to be built in order to move trucks, supplies and troops. Bridge-X is a field training exercise that brings together many different kinds of units for one common cause—crossing the Arkansas River. Active Duty and Army Reserve Soldiers come together for this exercise from all over the country and train hard to keep their Army skills sharp. Through all the sweat and camaraderie, they achieve mission success.

Biological Detection FTX
375th Chemical Company
Ft McClellan, AL
The Army Reserve Soldiers of the 375th Chemical Company have an important responsibility to monitor battlefield conditions and detect chemical or biological threats. During this Field Training Exercise, every individual will build on his or her previous experience by learning how to operate new field equipment, the Biological Integrated Detection System (BIDS). All the training the 375th Chemical Company has received comes down to this—the Field Training Exercise.

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