What are the odds I'll get a waiver?

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scornell
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Joined: 07/16/2017

Hello all!

Originally I tried to enlist in the Navy and was never "denied", but the recruiter was unbearable so I paid a visit to my local Army recruiter after about nine months of dealing with the Navy recruiter (I only chose Navy because I would have been a legacy). So now here I am waiting on word from my recruiter, after finding out that I've been disqualified, to find out if I am completely disqualified from the Army, or if there is a way around my issue.

I was diagnosed with chronic headaches at a very young age, around 3-4 months old, I'd say, but grew out of them at a young age as well. I am now 23 and haven't had a migraine or headache (aside from whatever you would consider a "normal" headache) in 12+ years. Serving in the military has always been a huge dream of mine and to be completely disqualified for headaches I had as a kid is a nightmare for me. I have requested information to find out if getting an MRI and being cleared by a civilian doctor to be fit for duty would make me eligible again. What are the odds I'll get the waiver if I shell out all of that money for the MRI? Again, I haven't had a debilitating migraine or headache or medication to treat either since I was maybe 8-10.

TIA for any input!

-Samantha

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MSG Glenn
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Joined: 08/31/2010
@Samantha

I'm truly sorry to hear that, Samantha. I have never really gotten a handle on the waiver system. I know a lot depends on the needs of the Military although some medical problems never have been waiverable. If you're still in contact with your Recruiter I'd run that by him. Don't go through a costly MRI along with a clearance from a civilian doc unless he thinks that might help.

Keep me updated & good luck!

scornell
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Joined: 07/16/2017
@MSG Glenn

Thanks for your input! I visited my civilian doctor yesterday and had a neurological exam done to establish whether she thought I was fit for duty. She agreed that I was one hundred percent fit for duty and wrote a clearance letter that I will be submitting to my recruiter tomorrow.

Thanks for the well-wishes!

MSG Glenn
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Joined: 08/31/2010
@Samantha

I wish you the best of luck. Let me know what your Recruiter tells you & keep me updated throughout the process.

SomeDumbNickname
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Joined: 09/10/2017
Hi. Welcome to capitalism. No

Hi. Welcome to capitalism. No one gives a crap if it's your life's dream. You are just a good and recruiters are the buyers who look how good you are. No one owes you anything. There is no justice. Actually you have no good reason to be rejected, but you know. They consider you defective and they don't want to take any risks. Sorry. I am in the same boat.

MSG Glenn
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Joined: 08/31/2010
The Army can afford...

...to be picky when there are more people who want to join than there are slots available. The LAST thing they need is someone who is "defective" (in your words). The Military in general & the Army in particular is an extremely harsh environment, especially in combat. Leadership needs all soldiers to carry their own weight at all times, again - especially in combat. There's enough stress in caring for wounded without anyone else adding to the load because they fell through the cracks & somehow made through BCT & AIT. There are many professional athletes who have been rejected for Military service due to injuries they received on the playing field. Physical standards were not met & the Army was not going to take the chance of that athlete needing medical care for something that occurred before he joined when there are Soldiers that need care for conditions that happened during Army duty. Medical care & medical people have always been lacking due to shortages especially during wartime.

The Military is NOT a democratic society.

scornell
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Joined: 07/16/2017
@MSG Glenn

Well it looks like the odds were in my favor. I submitted some documentation from my neurologist and I am approved for active duty. I'll be taking the DLAB sometime in the near future and choosing my MOS!

MSG Glenn
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Joined: 08/31/2010
Great News, Samantha!

Good luck on the DLAB. I recommend that you start getting into physical shape to prepare for BCT. Your Recruiter will help you there when you get involved with the Delayed Entry Program.

Keep us updated.