Book Review

Book Review: The Ultimate Basic Training Guidebook

One month after September 11, 2001, Michael Volkin enlisted into the Army Reserves. According to him, he left home "without an ounce of military knowledge", but he took notes on everything he did and saw during BCT. After graduating, he also picked the brains of his fellow soldiers - what did they do to get through BCT, how did they adapt, what do they wish they knew going in? With this information he assembled The Ultimate Basic Training Guidebook, with the goal that no other soldier should have to go through BCT without an idea of what to expect. Let's take a look at what this book offers, and if it fulfills his promise!

Your rating: None Average: 5 (3 votes)

One Million Steps (Book Review)

There are moments in time that are greater not because they are particularly unique but because they capture a truth about how we look at a larger-scale view. The grunts that went into Sangin, Afghanistan in 2010 faced an impossible task in a hostile territory surrounded by people that couldn't be trusted. Bing West captures a snapshot of the Marine Battalion 3/5 3rd Platoon as they enter Sangin to take over from our British partners, push back at the Taliban that roam carefree, and find some success before being pulled out of Afghanistan. One Million Steps: A Marine Platoon At War is part battle log of this platoon and part military analysis of the overall strategy in Afghanistan.

Your rating: None Average: 3.1 (9 votes)

Book Review: Tears of a Warrior

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is not a new development for soldiers. For hundreds of years, military personnel have known about the emotional and mental suffering that soldiers endure long after leaving the battlefield. It is a condition that doesn't just go away or fix itself. Soldiers and their families need to be able to identify PTSD and be willing to get help.

Tony and Janet Seahorn have lived with PTSD since Tony's return from Vietnam decades ago. Everything they have learned about the condition and how to treat it has been compiled in Tears of a Warrior: A Family's Story of Combat and Living with PTSD. This subject is personal for them and so the book reads like a friend or an acquaintance sharing their personal knowledge with you and not a dry reference book on PTSD.

Your rating: None Average: 3.3 (4 votes)

Book Review: The Ultimate Air Force Basic Training Guidebook

One of the scariest things about leaving for basic military training is venturing into the unknown - and anything that can give you a heads-up about what's to come can help you get in the right mindset to get the most out of basic training. Written by Senior Airman Nicholas Van Wormer - who graduated from Air Force Basic Military Training in 2007 - The Ultimate Air Force Basic Training Guidebook is designed to help answer many of the most common questions asked by those who are thinking about enlisting or getting ready to ship out!

Your rating: None Average: 4.7 (3 votes)

Book Review: National Guard 101, A Handbook for Spouses

To a lot of civilians, members of the National Guard aren't viewed as "real soldiers". They don't live on post, they aren't surrounded by the military lifestyle 24/7, and often their day-to-day jobs are not even related to the military.
Your rating: None Average: 5 (1 vote)

Book Review: The Soldier's Guide by the Department of the Army

The Soldier's Guide (published by Skyhorse Publishing) is a compilation of numerous Army regulations and manuals. LTC Charles C. Hagemeister (retired) compiled this edition of the manual and injects his own insight and numerous inspirational stories into the text to put a human aspect to what can be dry material. This book is styled very much like other US military documents with chapter and paragraph numbering and black and white images. In that way, it isn't only the content familiarizing the reader with the US Army way, but the very method that information is passed along is done is very much like an official manual - just a tad more casual in tone.

Your rating: None Average: 3.1 (12 votes)

Book Review: US Military History for Dummies

If you are interested in military history, or the history of the United States, you are probably familiar with most of the facts and events in this book. If you aren't a history buff, this book promises a much quicker and easier way to get a broad overview of the history of American conflicts. Let's see if US Military History for Dummies can live up to that promise.

Your rating: None Average: 3.8 (5 votes)

Book Review: Master the ASVAB by Peterson's


If you've been on this site at all, you probably know about the importance of the ASVAB. This test, taken during your short visit to a Military Entry Processing Station (MEPS), determines both your eligibility to enlist in the military and your available career paths once enlisted.

Your rating: None Average: 4.6 (14 votes)

Undaunted: The Real Story of America's Servicewomen in Today's Military

While serving in the US Army in Afghanistan, you are one of the leaders of a nightly convoy of trucks between two facilities. At the last minute, a soldier asks if he can fill an empty seat so he can catch a ride. You let him come along. On the trip, your convoy it hit by IEDs. That young man you let catch a ride...he is dead. Although life in a war zone is deadly, it is still mentally jarring when non-combat activities are just as likely a target as an infantry unit. And that is part of the reality for women in the US military. The female convoy leader was in a non-combat role and yet still very much in harm's way.

Undaunted: The Real Story of America's Servicewomen in Today's Military by Tanya Biank tells us about the lives of four servicewomen in the US military. Biank chronicles their life and career events from 2006 through 2011 and provides some backstory of how each of the women ended up where they are. The book shifts back and forth between the women, following their lives in sections broken down by years.

Your rating: None Average: 3.5 (11 votes)

A Family's Guide to the Military For Dummies

Normal adults can not begin to understand how different military life is until you are living it. Even the children of military parents (known as military "Brats") do not understand how different it is from civilian life. Military members and their spouses however are immersed from day one in a new culture with different customs and traditions that can be challenging and even scary at first. But with time (years) and experience, this new life can become fun and exciting as you understand it better and learn about the many "perks" available for military members and their families.

Or, you can read Part I of "A Family's Guide to the Military For Dummies" and skip the years of time and experience and go right to the "fun and exciting" parts.

Your rating: None Average: 3.1 (18 votes)
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