US DoD Feeds

Contracts For July 22, 2016

DoD Contract Announcements - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 16:00
 CONTRACTS NAVY Huntington Ingalls Inc., Newport News, Virginia, is being awarded a $194,802,989 modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-2111), to extend the period of performance from 12 months to 18 months for continued advance planning of the refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) of USS George Washington (CVN 73).  This
Categories: US DoD Feeds

DoD Announces Update to the DoD Law of War Manual

DoD News Releases - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 23:01
Today, the Department of Defense released an update to the 2015 Law of War manual.The manual is a guide for DoD personnel responsible for implementing the law of war and executing military operations. The current manual was released in June 2015 after a multi-year effort by military and civilian lawyers from across the Defense Department to develop
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Contracts For July 21, 2016

DoD Contract Announcements - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 16:00
CONTRACTS DEFENSE HEALTH AGENCY Humana Government Business Inc., Louisville, Kentucky, has been selected to provide managed care support (MCS) to the Department of Defense TRICARE program in the East Region.  The MCS contractor will assist the Military Health System in operating an integrated health care delivery system combining the resources of
Categories: US DoD Feeds

General Officer Assignments

DoD News Releases - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 14:25
The chief of staff, Air Force announced the following assignments:Brig. Gen. Kenneth T. Bibb, Jr., vice commander, 618th Air Operations Center (Tanker Airlift Control Center), Air Mobility Command, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, to commander, 618th Air Operations Center (Tanker Airlift Control Center), Air Mobility Command, Scott Air Force Base,
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Statement by Secretary of Defense Ash Carter on Rep. Mark Takai

DoD News Releases - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 12:24
 I was saddened to learn of the passing of Congressman Mark Takai. Congressman Takai served the people of Hawaii and the nation from the state capitol in Honolulu ,to the halls of Congress, to the deserts of Kuwait, where he served as an Army National Guardsman.  As a National Guard officer, he served with distinction for 17 years, almost to the
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Opening Remarks at Counter-ISIL Foreign and Defense Minister Meeting

DoD Speeches - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 09:45
Opening Remarks at Counter-ISIL Foreign and Defense Minister Meeting As Delivered by Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, Washington, D.C., July 21, 2016

Well, good morning, everyone.

And thank you, John. Thank you for that very comprehensive and forward-looking and absolutely on target depiction of the threat we face but also the problem that's represented in this room and the certainty of victory.

It’s great to join so many friends and colleagues here today, allies and partners. I know Jim Clapper was here earlier this morning for a briefing.  Jim, I want to thank you for your hard work and leadership here.

And I particularly want to thank John Kerry for that introduction, that wonderful speech, for hosting us today, and for all his work to counter ISIL and to end the civil war in Syria.

I can ask for no better partner in government, John.  And, at a critical time in the world, the United States – and all our allies and partners – can ask for no finer, more dedicated, or more tireless a diplomat than you.

Now, while we’ve held Counter-ISIL defense minister meetings before – including yesterday’s very productive meeting at Joint Base Andrews – today’s discussion is the first we’ve held together with our diplomatic and civilian counterparts.  That’s important, because we know that defeating ISIL is more than a one-country, a one-military, or a one-ministry job.  We all have work to do, and we all have to work together.

And this is a critically important time for our counter-ISIL campaign.  Thanks to our global coalition, our clear and deliberate military campaign plan, our dedicated local partner forces, and the hard work and sacrifices of our countries’ military personnel, we now have momentum in this fight and clear results on the ground.  And this week, we’re making the further plans and the further commitments that will help us deliver to ISIL the lasting defeat that it deserves.  Together, we’re going to destroy the fact and the idea of an Islamic state based on ISIL’s barbaric ideology.

This morning, I’d like to briefly review our coalition military campaign and our very productive discussion we had yesterday.  

Our coalition’s military campaign plan has three objectives.  First, to destroy the parent tumor of ISIL in Iraq and Syria.  As recent attacks remind us, ISIL’s safe havens threaten not only the lives of the Iraqi and Syrian peoples, but also the security of our own citizens.  And the sooner we defeat ISIL in Iraq and Syria, the safer our countries will be.  But while it’s necessary to defeat ISIL in Iraq and Syria, it is not sufficient since this cancer can and in some cases – Afghanistan and Libya, for example – it has metastasized not to mention intangible geography and terrain of the Internet

So our second objective is to combat ISIL’s metastases everywhere they emerge around the world.  And the third objective, a very important one , is to support, which we do as defense ministers, our national governments’ efforts – diplomatic, economic, homeland and border security, intelligence, law enforcement – to protect our homelands and our people.  All three of these objectives are necessary.

In January this year, we updated our comprehensive Coalition Military Campaign Plan to meet those three objectives.  Our campaign’s strategic approach is to identify and enable capable and motivated local forces who can deliver ISIL a lasting defeat with our strong, mighty support.  Only local forces can deliver and sustain such a defeat.  U.S. and coalition forces can enable them with our vast military power, but it’s local forces who must hold and govern territory after it has been retaken from ISIL and restore a decent life to the people who live there. 

Now, over the last year, we’ve pursued a number of deliberate decisions and actions to accelerate this Coalition Military Campaign Plan and hasten ISIL’s lasting defeat.  A year ago, we put our campaign in its entirety in Iraq and Syria under one single command, charging Lieutenant General Sean MacFarland as the overall operational commander.  Then we introduced a series of accelerants to help us gather momentum.  And, of course, we asked all our coalition countries to make additional contributions to the campaign – which they did, which you did.

As we did so, we also set in motion a series of specific and deliberate steps through the winter, the spring, and now the summer – the first plays of the game, as President Obama called them.  And since then – play by play, town after town, from every direction and in every domain – our campaign has accelerated further, squeezing ISIL and rolling it back towards Raqqa and Mosul.  By isolating those two cities, we’re effectively setting the stage to collapse ISIL’s control over them.

We see that on the ground.  In Iraq, as I saw firsthand during my visit last week, we’re enabling the dedicated Iraqi Security Forces and Peshmerga led by Prime Minister Abadi and supported by Kurdish Regional President Barzani.  And after clearing Ramadi and establishing a staging base in Makhmur, the Iraqi Security Forces moved on to liberate Hit, Rutbah, and Fallujah.  Then early last week, they seized the strategically important Qayyarah West airfield, which is a critical logistical springboard for the effort to collapse ISIL’s control of Mosul. 

And in Syria, we’re also seeing results.  After seizing Shaddadi – a crucial junction on the road between Mosul and Raqqa – our partners on the ground have now surrounded Manbij City, which is one of the last junctions connecting Raqqa to the outside world and a key transit point for external plotters threatening our homelands.

We’ve also been pressuring ISIL by systematically eliminating their key leaders and their financial base.  In addition to taking out key ISIL ministers and capturing one of the principals of ISIL’s chemical warfare enterprise, we’ve killed over 20 of ISIL’s external operators who were actively plotting to attack our personnel and our homelands.  And wherever our local partners have moved – whether in Anbar, Ninewah, or Manbij – we have taken out ISIL’s field commanders.  Meanwhile, we’re continuing attacks on ISIL’s economic infrastructure – from oil wells and trucks to cash storage sites.  And we’re taking the fight to ISIL across all domains, including cyber.

Thanks to the hard work and sacrifice of our local partners and our servicemembers, and additional contributions from the nations all around this room, we’ve seized opportunities, reinforced success, and taken the fight to the enemy.  But we are not going to rest. 

Yesterday, we also reviewed – and agreed on – the next plays in our campaign, which, of course, we’re  not going to discuss publically yet.  But let me be clear: they culminate in the collapse of ISIL’s control over cities of Mosul and Raqqa. 

Next, we identified the capabilities and support required to execute those next plays.  Since our first full defense ministerial in Brussels in February, our nations, including the United States thanks to President Obama, have provided even more support to accelerate the campaign, as our local partners have made advances in the theater. 

But we’re all going to need to do more.  The United States, France, the United Kingdom, Australia, Sweden, Finland, and several others have recently committed – some as recent as yesterday – to contribute even more to the military campaign.  It’s encouraging to see so many countries continue to be willing to do more. And there are others as well, who will make their contributions public in due course.

Of course, even when we win this fight – and let there be no doubt that we will – there’ll still be much more to be done.  There will be towns to rebuild, there will be services to reestablish, and communities to restore.  Such progress is critical to ensuring ISIL once defeated, stays defeated.  And so, we must ensure that when that time comes, the Iraqi and Syrian people have what they need to hold, stabilize, and govern their own territory. 

For that reason, we cannot – let me repeat that – we cannot allow the coalition’s stabilization and governance efforts to lag behind our military progress.  That was one of the biggest strategic concerns voiced at yesterday’s defense ministerial, and it will surely be discussed again here today. 

And that’s a good thing…because making sure there’s no such lag must be a strategic priority.  For that reason, I commend John, his team, and many of your countries’ civilian and diplomatic agencies for the work you are doing to enhance stabilization and governance efforts, including raising more than $2 billion dollars at yesterday’s pledging conference to assist Iraq with humanitarian aid, de-mining, immediate stabilization, and longer-term recovery. 

Of course, as I said earlier, destroying ISIL’s parent tumor in Iraq and Syria is necessary, but it’s not sufficient.  That’s why, yesterday, we also discussed how we can continue to combat ISIL wherever it might attempt to take hold, and how our military campaign can best support our national governments’ efforts to protect our respective homelands and our people.

Let me close by saying thank you to all of you in the room, my partners, friends for your commitment to this fight, and for your work in the counter-ISIL campaign and at our conferences this week.  I look forward to the conversations today – and to the commitments our nations will be making – to ensure that together, together we will deliver ISIL the lasting defeat it deserves. 

Thank you. 
Categories: US DoD Feeds

General Officer Assignments

DoD News Releases - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 09:29
The chief of staff, Army announces the following officer assignments:Maj. Gen. Paul M. Benenati, U.S. Army Reserve, commander (Troop Program Unit), U.S. Army Reserve Support Command, First U.S. Army; and deputy commander (Troop Program Unit), First U.S. Army, Rock Island, Illinois, to deputy chief of staff, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command,
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Readout of Secretary Carter's meeting with Australian Minister for Defense Marise Payne

DoD News Releases - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 16:19
 Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook provided the following readout: Secretary of Defense Ash Carter met today with Australian Minister for Defense Marise Payne on the margins of the C-ISIL Ministerial in Washington, D.C. Secretary Carter and Minister Payne discussed a range of security issues during their meeting, including their mutual commitment
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Contracts For July 20, 2016

DoD Contract Announcements - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 16:00
CONTRACTS MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY Orbital ATK Inc., Chandler, Arizona, has been awarded a $182,067,817 fixed-price incentive, fixed-price-plus-award-fee, cost-plus-award-fee, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the Medium Range Ballistic Missile Type 3 Configuration 2 target system including production equipment, logistics, associated support
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Readout of Secretary of Defense Ash Carter's Meeting with Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince and Minister of Defense Mohammed bin Salman

DoD News Releases - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 15:12
Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook provided the following readout:‎ Today Secretary of Defense Ash Carter met with Deputy Crown Prince and Minister of Defense Mohammed bin Salman of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on the margins of the counter-ISIL Defense Ministerial held in Washington DC. The secretary thanked Deputy Crown Prince bin Salman for
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Readout of Secretary Carter's Meeting with French Minister of Defense Jean-Yves Le Drian

DoD News Releases - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 11:38
Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook provided the following readout:       Secretary of Defense Ash Carter met with French Minister of Defense Jean-Yves Le Drian today at Joint Base Andrews outside Washington ahead of the latest counter-ISIL defense ministerial. Secretary Carter offered his deepest condolences to the French people and government in
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Opening Remarks at Counter-ISIL Defense Minister Meeting

DoD Speeches - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 10:04
Opening Remarks at Counter-ISIL Defense Minister Meeting As Delivered by Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, July 20, 2016

Good morning, my friends.  It’s very good to see you.  We have here represented all – every single member – of the international coalition to combat ISIL – almost all of them represented at the ministerial level, the defense minister level.  And I’m very grateful for each and every one of you for taking the time to be here, and travel the distance that you did.  It’s good to see so many friends around this table.  And this is a time – this is a very important time for us to meet, and it’s an important time to show our solidarity as friends.

Thanks to this global coalition, our clear and deliberate military campaign plan, our dedicated local partner forces, and the sacrifices of our militaries’ members, we now have momentum in this fight and we have clear results on the ground.  And today, we’ll make the plans and commitments that will help us deliver ISIL a lasting defeat – the defeat it deserves.  We’re going to destroy both the fact and the idea of an Islamic state based on ISIL’s barbaric ideology.

Our coalition’s military campaign plan, as you all know, has three objectives.  The first is to destroy ISIL’s parent tumor in Iraq and Syria.  That’s necessary, but it’s not sufficient.  As recent attacks in our homelands remind us, ISIL’s safe havens threaten not only the lives of the Iraqi and Syrian people, but also the security of our citizens in other countries.  And the sooner we defeat ISIL in Iraq and Syria, the safer our countries will be. 

So we have a second objective also, which is to combat ISIL’s metastases everywhere they emerge around the world.  And we have a third and very important mission, which is to help protect our homeland, along with law enforcement and intelligence officials. 

Now, in January of this year, we all – those of us at this table – updated our comprehensive Coalition Military Campaign Plan to meet those three objectives.  Our campaign’s strategic approach is to identify and enable capable and motivated local forces who can deliver ISIL a lasting defeat.  Only local forces can deliver and sustain such a defeat, by holding and governing territory after it has been retaken from ISIL.  

And we’ve pursued a number of deliberate decisions and actions to accelerate this plan and hasten ISIL’s defeat. 

This time last year, we put our coalition military campaign plan for Iraq and Syria under one single command, charging Lieutenant General Sean MacFarland as the overall operational commander.  Then we introduced a series of initial accelerants to help us gather momentum.  And of course, we asked all our coalition countries to make additional contributions to the campaign, and you did.

As we did so, we also set in motion a series of specific and deliberate steps through the winter, the spring, and now in the summer – the first plays in the game, as President Obama called them – that we would accomplish as soon as possible to put ISIL on a path to a lasting defeat.  And since then – play by play, town after town, from every direction, and in every domain – our campaign has accelerated further, squeezing ISIL and rolling it back towards Raqqa and Mosul.  We’re isolating those two cities and effectively setting the stage to collapse ISIL’s control over them.

We see that on the ground.  In Iraq, as I saw firsthand last week during my most recent visit there, we’re enabling the dedicated Iraqi Security Forces and the Peshmerga led by Prime Minister Abadi and supported by Kurdish Regional President Barzani.  And after clearing Ramadi and establishing a staging base in Makhmur, the Iraqi Security Forces moved on to liberate Hit, Rutbah, and Fallujah.  Then early last week, they seized the strategically important Qayyarah West airfield, which is a critical logistical springboard for the effort to collapse ISIL’s control of Mosul.

And in Syria, we’re also seeing results.  After seizing Shaddadi – a crucial junction on the road between Mosul and Raqqa – our partners on the ground have now surrounded Manbij City, which is one of the last junctions connecting Raqqa to the outside world and a key transit point for external plotters threatening the homelands.

We’ve also been pressuring ISIL by systematically eliminating their key leaders and their financial base.  In addition to taking out key ISIL ministers and capturing one of the principals of ISIL’s chemical warfare enterprise, we’ve killed over 20 of ISIL’s external operators who were actively plotting to attack our homelands and our personnel.  And wherever our local partners have moved – whether in Anbar, Ninewah, or Manbij – we’ve taken out ISIL’s field commanders.  Meanwhile, we’re continuing attacks on ISIL’s economic infrastructure – from oil wells and trucks to cash storage sites.  And we’re taking the fight to ISIL across all domains, including cyber.

Thanks to the hard work and sacrifice of our local partners and our servicemembers, and additional, timely coalition contributions from those gathered here, we’ve seized opportunities, reinforced success, and taken the fight to the enemy.

But we must not rest.  We need to make the plans and the commitments to build on our momentum and deliver ISIL’s lasting defeat.   Today, we need to review – and agree on – the next plays in our campaign, which General Votel, who’s doing an extraordinary job on this campaign, will walk us through on a map, and we’ll discuss them in detail.  And then we’ll identify the capabilities and the support required to execute those next plays. 

Since February, our nations, including the United States, have provided even more support to accelerate the campaign, as our local partners have made advances.  In fact, two-thirds of our coalition members have pledged or already made additional military contributions since then, while many other members and nations have contributed vital economic, political, and humanitarian support. 

But we’re all going to need to do more.  Today, we’ll identify both our enduring and emerging requirements and review our detailed metrics matrix of national contributions, which you’ve seen before – going through it row by row, column and column, and country by country.  We must ensure that our partners on the ground have what they need to win and fight and then hold, rebuild, and govern their territory.

This last point, the need to ensure that our economic and political campaigns do not lag behind our military progress – do not lag behind our military progress – is critical and a significant strategic priority.  We’ll discuss it today, and then again tomorrow at the State Department with our Foreign Minister colleagues. 

Of course, as I said earlier, destroying ISIL’s parent tumor in Iraq and Syria is necessary, but it’s not sufficient.  ISIL’s influence and activities continue to pose a threat – in Afghanistan, where I was last week, as well as in Libya, and elsewhere.  Today, we’ll also discuss how we can continue to combat ISIL wherever it might attempt to take hold, and how our military campaign can best support our national governments’ efforts to protect our respective homelands and our people.

That’s a full agenda and this is a critical moment, and today is an important opportunity to build on our momentum and deliver ISIL a lasting defeat.

Before we begin our discussions, let me ask my friend and colleague, French Minister of Defense Jean-Yves Le Drian, to make a few opening comments as well.

Jean-Yves, you have been a great leader, a critical partner, a strong leader, and a staunch ally in this fight.  I want to offer again my condolences to the French people and the French government for your nation’s losses in last week’s attack in Nice, our total solidarity with the French people, and our admiration for your strong personal leadership.  The floor is yours, Jean-Yves.

Thank you.

Categories: US DoD Feeds

Readout of Secretary Carter's Call with Turkish Minister of Defense Fikri Işik

DoD News Releases - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 16:27
Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook provided the following readout: Secretary of Defense Ash Carter spoke today by telephone with Turkish Minister of Defense Fikri Işik.  Secretary Carter reiterated the support of the United States for Turkey's democratically elected civilian government and the rule of law. For his part, Minister Işik expressed his
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Contracts For July 19, 2016

DoD Contract Announcements - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 16:00
CONTRACTS NAVY Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded a $544,668,978 modification to the previously awarded fixed-price-incentive-firm target, Lot 17-21 multi-year contract (N00019-12-C-2001).  This modification provides for the long lead production materials and the manufacture and delivery of four MV-22 tilt rotor
Categories: US DoD Feeds

Readout of Deputy Secretary Bob Work's Meeting with Latvian Minister of Defense Raimonds Bergmanis

DoD News Releases - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 15:27
Pentagon Deputy Press Secretary Gordon Trowbridge provided the following readout: Deputy Secretary of Defense Bob Work met with Latvian Minister of Defense Raimonds Bergmanis today at the Pentagon in Washington, DC. Deputy Secretary Work reaffirmed the United States' iron-clad commitment to upholding NATO's Article 5 obligations to defend the
Categories: US DoD Feeds

DoD Identifies Air Force Casualty

DoD News Releases - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 13:00
The Department of Defense announced today the death of an airman who was supporting Operation Inherent Resolve.  1st Lt. Anais A. Tobar, 25, of Miami, Florida, died July 18 in Southwest Asia from a non-combat-related injury. She was assigned to the 4th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. For more
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Medal of Honor Ceremony for Lieutenant Colonel Charles Kettles

DoD Speeches - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 10:00
Medal of Honor Ceremony for Lieutenant Colonel Charles Kettles As Delivered by Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, Pentagon Auditorium, July 19, 2016

Deputy Secretary Work, Vice Chairman Selva, General Allyn, family and friends of Lieutenant Colonel Kettles, thank you, thank you all, for joining us today. I particularly want to welcome his wife Ann, son Michael, daughter Cathy, brother-in-law Patrick, nephew Michael. We’re so proud to have you all here.

We gather today here to honor an American hero…though, like the three other Medal of Honor recipients who honor us with their presence today, he would resist the description. In fact, for nearly 50 years he stayed quiet, content to allow his remarkable story to reside mainly in the memories of fellow soldiers like Roland Sheck and Dewey Smith, who are here with him today. Thanks, Gus.

And it would have stayed that way if his wife Ann hadn’t prompted him to tell the story to William Vollano, a dedicated volunteer with the Library of Congress’s Veterans History Project who is helping preserve and pass on these vital stories for generations to follow. Even after some prompting, Lieutenant Colonel Kettles downplayed his role, talking up the heroism of his fellow soldiers, and the technical capabilities of the UH-1 Huey he flew in a new kind of war. And that, by the way, he still loves, flying in one a few weeks ago.

Like so many of our veterans, he was content to know that he’d done his job, he’d served his country, and he’d looked out for his fellow soldier. But when this remarkable story was brought to my attention last August, I agreed that it was important to properly recognize his actions, and asked Congress to pass special legislation allowing this belated honor.

And thanks to the efforts of Representative Dingell, Senators Stabenow and Peters, and Chairman Rogers, President Obama was able to present our nation’s highest military honor to Lieutenant Colonel Kettles yesterday in the White House. And today, it is our profound honor to add his name to the wall in the Hall of Heroes here in the Pentagon.

But first I want to talk about a different wall, just over the river, downtown, across Potomac. There, as you all know, are over 58,000 names inscribed in black granite on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Every name represents a great loss for a family, and our nation. But as President Obama noted yesterday, because of the valor of then-Major Kettles and his crew on May 15th, 1967, there are 44 names that are not on that wall.

Just think about what that means. How many Thanksgiving tables have had an extra chair through the years because of his actions? How many weddings, childbirths, and graduations were made possible because Major Kettles and his crew returned, again and again, to the hot landing zone on the Sông Trà Câu riverbed?

We can only wonder. Just as we can only wonder what must have gone through Major Kettles’ mind the first time he approached the landing zone and saw an entrenched enemy in battalion force, intensely firing upon the outnumbered American troops below. But we know that in the face of all that, he landed. And we know he stayed under fire long enough to offload reinforcements and supplies, and to take on the wounded.

We may never fully comprehend what must have gone through Major Kettles’ mind next as he piloted his damaged helicopter back to base, full of holes, leaking fuel. But we know that he made it, saving all on board. And then he jumped to another Huey.

We can only imagine what must have gone through Major Kettles’ mind as returned to the landing zone, fully aware of what he would face. But we know that he led six helicopters in, exposed to withering fire, to exfiltrate the embattled force.

And then, we can only guess what went through Major Kettles’ mind as he made the defining decision to double back yet again – this time for the eight soldiers who remained pinned down on the ground and under continuous fire. Surely he must have known that as the only aircraft returning, he would take all the fire. And he surely knew that without any air support, his odds of successfully taking off again weren’t good.

But we know that in the face of those odds, he did land. We know that he retrieved the squad. And we know that despite being hit by a mortar round and machine gun fire – damaging his tail boom and his main rotor blade, and shattering both front windshields and the chin bubble – he still got into the air, and back to safety once again.

No, we cannot fully know what went through the mind of Major Charles Kettles that day. But we know what motivated him. We see it in the names on the walls of this very room, we can feel what has always motivated the men and women of our military: Duty. Honor. Country. And the deeply held conviction that we will never, ever, leave a soldier, sailor, airman, or Marine behind.

For many American servicemembers in harm’s way, the first indication that they would see their family again was the sound of helicopter blades beating against the sky. Without the valor of the helicopter pilots in Vietnam, countless additional names would have been added to the wall across the river.

And without the pilots and crews who continue the watch today – in Blackhawks, Ospreys, Chinooks, Lakotas, Pave Hawks, Super Stallions, Cobras, Apaches and more, over Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere – many more would have been lost over the past 15 years of war.

Today, as we honor Lieutenant Colonel Kettles, we honor the many other pilots and crews who have taken great risks, and made great sacrifices, to support the warfighter on the ground and bring them safely home.

If you were to walk from this auditorium up the stairs to my office, you’d see a large painting featuring a line from the book of Isaiah that well describes the man we honor today:  “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” the line goes. “Here am I, send me.”  

Lieutenant Colonel Kettles, you’ve never hesitated to answer “send me” when the call came – whether it was serving active-duty tours in Korea, Japan, and Thailand, or returning from civilian life as a citizen soldier to serve multiple tours in Vietnam, or displaying conspicuous gallantry in the face of enemy fire on the riverbed at Sông Trà Câu. On behalf of the families of the 44 men you helped save that day, on behalf of the men and women of the Department of Defense, and on behalf of a deeply grateful nation, I congratulate you on this well-deserved honor, and I thank you for your service to the United States of America. Thank you. 

Categories: US DoD Feeds

Contracts For July 18, 2016

DoD Contract Announcements - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 16:00
CONTRACTS DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Hudson Technologies Co.,* Pearl River, New York, has been awarded a maximum $148,514,169 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for compressed gas and cylinder products. This was a competitive acquisition with two responses received. This is a five-year base
Categories: US DoD Feeds
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